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Museum Musings

Back in January when Yim and I went to the Cleveland Museum of Art to see the Paul Gauguin exhibit, we had a good bit of fun.  Museums are great diversions.  They open your mind and leave you feeling alive and a part of this world.  Anyone with a creative cell in their body and a pulsating heart in their chest will recognize this.  And hasn’t everyone my age wanted to have a day like this for themselves since 1986?:

Thank you, Ferris Bueller.

And that’s not all.  Woody Allen fans can certainly relate to the museum as a location for dramatic emphasis.

Back in Cleveland, Yim and I had time to tour some of the other wings of the museum before heading home.  We found expression amidst the sculptures.

In Gallery 9 (my favorite number), the gallery of European Art: Mythology, History & Portraiture, I saw something that caught my eye. 

The useless little toe on this alabaster foot looked familiar.  As did the plump hanging lobe of this ear.  You know, either your lobes hang or they don’t.

The conclusion?  Napoleon’s niece looks like young me.

That’s Elisa Baciocchi, daughter of the Grand-Duke of Tuscany.  Coincidence?  I think not.

Now, when Lord Mycol was a baby he had a halo of blond curls framing his chubby cheeks, blue eyes, and plump lips.

He was just like a little cupid.  And while baby cupids are cute, teenage cupids can sometimes be comical.

Do these guys resemble each other? That’s Cupid on the left and Lord Mycol on the right.  If you click on the link you will see the painting in its entirety.  The description calls this ‘humorous eroticism’, and the museum decided to up the ante with their first question to the right of the photo.  Go ahead, click it.

When we left Gallery 9 and turned the corner into the Hinman B. Hurlbut Collection, I was in utter awe of this painting.

https://i1.wp.com/judaica-art.com/images/uploads/William%20Adolphe%20Bouguereau/Rest_1879-border.jpg

I saw it from a distance and approached it directly.  I was pleased to read the placard beside it.

And once again I was struck by the European resemblance.  19th century Italian peasant child on the left, 21st century Italian pleasant child on the right.

A visit to the museum will show you how everything has changed, and yet it has all remained the same.

Lastly, before going to see the Gauguin exhibit we researched some of his works online.  I really liked The Swineherd and decided I would like it as a gift for my birthday.

I was good and got my wish.  Now it is matted and framed and above my mantel, where every time I look at it I can remember all of the good memories I just shared with you.

And F**k you very much WordPress for making it so extremely “easy” to put up posts like this.  If someone can explain to me in logical terms why the dashboard editing page should not be identical to the product that will publish for public viewing, I’d love to hear it.  It was absolutely not my intention to place words between my photos, but after toying around with the editing page for THREE HOURS and still not being able to reach a true solution, I settled on publishing this sub-standard layout.  Please excuse me, it was not meant as art.

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